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Changes in the Normal Pattern of H-Reflex Inhibition During Muscle Release in ALS

  • M. Schieppati
  • A. Nardone
  • M. Poloni
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 209)

Abstract

Among the motor impairments which affect spastic patients, trouble in voluntarily terminating muscle contraction can hardly be considered a minor defect, as one can understand after careful inquiries into the clinical history. In normal individuals detailed information in the physiological mechanisms operating in the control of muscle release are now available [1-4]. The data strongly suggest a participation of the presynaptic inhibition of the autogenetic la afferents[5] from the relaxing muscle, actively brought about by the command to release.

Keywords

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Patient Motor Neuron Disease Presynaptic Inhibition Force Decay 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • M. Schieppati
    • 1
  • A. Nardone
    • 1
  • M. Poloni
    • 2
  1. 1.Istituto di Fisiologia Umana IIItaly
  2. 2.Clinica Neurologica IUniversità di MilanoMilanItaly

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