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The Pathogenetic Role of Metals in Motor Neuron Disease — The Participation of Aluminum

Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 209)

Abstract

Among possible causative factors, an association of metal(s) and motor neuron disease (MND) has been repeatedly reported since Aran’s description on lead intoxication with amyotrophy in 1850[1].

Keywords

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Motor Neuron Disease Anterior Horn Motor Neuron Disease Central Nervous System Tissue 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Y. Yase
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Neurological DiseasesWakayama Medical CollegeJapan

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