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Autoimmune Involvement in Motor Neurone Disease

  • J. Aspin
  • R. Harrison
  • A. Jehanli
  • G. G. Lunt
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 209)

Abstract

The possibility of an autoimmune pathogenesis in motor neurone disease (MND) has been debated for many years with little consensus. However, recent evidence from different sources has served to redirect attention towards such an involvement. Thus, early findings of a serum-borne neurotoxic factor in MND patients[l] have been confirmed by Roisen et al.[2], while Gurney and his colleagues[3,4] have reported the presence in MND sera of autoantibodies to a muscle-derived growth factor for spinal neurones.

Keywords

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Motor Neurone Disease Stimulation Index Spinal Neurone Spinal Cord Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Aspin
    • 1
  • R. Harrison
    • 1
  • A. Jehanli
    • 1
  • G. G. Lunt
    • 1
  1. 1.Biochemistry DepartmentUniversity of BathBathUK

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