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Relationships of Changes in Postheparin Hepatic and Lipoprotein Lipase Activity to HDL-Cholesterol Changes Following Weight Loss Achieved by Dieting versus Exercise

  • Marcia L. Stefanick
  • Richard B. Terry
  • William L. Haskell
  • Peter D. Wood
Part of the GWUMC Department of Biochemistry Annual Spring Symposia book series (GWUN)

Abstract

Postheparin hepatic (HLA) and lipoprotein lipase activities (LPLA) were studied in moderately overweight (27.7 ± 0.47% body fat, mean ± S.E.) sedentary men aged 30–59 before and after randomization to control status (C.N = 41) or to a 1-year weight loss program by moderate dieting without exercise (D, N = 38) or exercise (running) without dieting (E, N = 44). After 6 weeks of weight stabilization at 1 year, both D and E had lost significant (P > 0.01) weight (-8.0 kg and -4.4 kg, respectively) relative to C. primarily as fat mass ( -6.0 kg and -3.8 kg), whereas only D lost nonfat mass (-2.0 kg). Compared to E, D lost more fat mass (P < 0.05) and nonfat mass (P < 0.01), but changes in percentage body fat did not differ between D and E, although these were significant relative to C ( -4.4% and -3.1%; P < 0.001). Both ΔHDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and ΔHDL2-C were elevated (p < 0.01) in D and E versus C. but ΔHDL2-C correlated with loss of body fat in E only. Relative to C., HLA was reduced from base line (7.7 ± 0.3 mU/ml per min) in both D (-0.97 ± 0.31, P < 0.01) and E (-0.70 ± 0.30. P < 0.05). whereas increases in LPLA were not significant for D(P < 0.21) or E (P= 0.13) Both ΔHLA and ΔLPLA correlated (Spearman’s ρ) with changes in body composition and HDL-cholesterol and HDL-mass. In summary, at 1 year ΔHLA was closely associated with weight changes in D and E, whereas ΔLPLA correlated with these changes in E only. Furthermore, significant relationships for ΔHLA and ΔLPLA PLA versus ΔHDL-C and ΔHDL-mass were found only in E.

Keywords

Lipase Activity Lipoprotein Lipase Hepatic Lipase Lipoprotein Lipase Activity Lipid Research Clinic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marcia L. Stefanick
    • 1
  • Richard B. Terry
    • 1
  • William L. Haskell
    • 1
  • Peter D. Wood
    • 1
  1. 1.Stanford Center for Research in Disease PreventionStanford UniversityStanfordUSA

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