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Use of DNA Polymorphisms to Investigate the Role of Apolipoprotein B in the Determination of Serum Cholesterol Levels

  • Anna M. Kessling
  • Philippa J. Talmud
  • Nazzarena Barni
  • Peter Carlsson
  • Caterina Darnfors
  • Gunnar Bjursell
  • Stephen E. Humphries
Part of the GWUMC Department of Biochemistry Annual Spring Symposia book series (GWUN)

Abstract

We have investigated the frequencies of two restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) of the apo B gene in normo-and hyperlipidemic individuals. In individuals with type III hyperlipidemia, the allele frequency for the RFLP detected with Xbal is significantly different from the allele frequency in normolipidemic individuals or in those with other types of hyperlipidemia. Within the normolipidemic population, homozygotes for the rare allele of the Xbal RFLP have a significantly higher serum cholesterol than homozygotes for the common allele. Apolipoprotein B gene variants may thus be involved in the determination of serum cholesterol levels.

Keywords

Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Serum Cholesterol Level Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism Human Apolipoprotein High Serum Cholesterol 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anna M. Kessling
    • 1
  • Philippa J. Talmud
    • 1
  • Nazzarena Barni
    • 1
  • Peter Carlsson
    • 2
  • Caterina Darnfors
    • 2
  • Gunnar Bjursell
    • 2
  • Stephen E. Humphries
    • 1
  1. 1.Charing Cross Sunley Research CentreHammersmith, LondonEngland
  2. 2.Department of Medical Biochemistry and MedicineUniversity of GothenburgGothenburgSweden

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