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Evaluating School Psychologists and School Psychological Services

  • Jonathan Sandoval
  • Nadine M. Lambert

Abstract

Without question, the practice of evaluating school psychologists is in its infancy. In spite of the fact that a number of articles have appeared on the subject (Bennett, 1980; Fairchild, 1980; Zins, 1984), there is no set methodology or approach to the evaluation of school psychologists that is widespread in the field, that has withstood the test of normal measurement standards, or that even has withstood the test of time in that it has been in use for more than a decade in a particular location. Perhaps this state of affairs exists because the practice of psychology generally is difficult to evaluate. Nevertheless, strides have been made in other fields as are reflected in the other chapters in this volume.

Keywords

School Psychologist Psychological Service Professional Psychology Mental Health Consultation Crisis Counseling 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jonathan Sandoval
    • 1
  • Nadine M. Lambert
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of EducationUniversity of California, DavisDavisUSA
  2. 2.School of EducationUniversity of California, BerkeleyBerkeleyUSA

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