Graduate Education and Training in Health Psychology

  • Joseph A. Istvan
  • Joseph D. Matarazzo

Abstract

Few fields of study in psychology have experienced as explosive a growth of interest during the past decade as health psychology. Demonstration of the interest in this emergent field can be found on a variety of fronts—in the growth of discipline-specific journals, in the award of increasing amounts of federal and private monies for health psychology research, and in the establishment of graduate programs that attempt to train students in the expanding field. It is this last area of development of this subdiscipline that is the primary focus of the present chapter.

Keywords

Demic Entity Income Explosive Beach Arena 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. American Psychological Association, Committee on Training in Clinical Psychology. (1947). Recommended graduate training program in clinical psychology. American Psychologist, 2, 539–558.Google Scholar
  2. Belar, C. D., Wilson, E., & Hughes, H. (1982). Health psychology training in doctoral psychology programs. Health Psychology, 1, 289–299.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Cohen, L. K. (1981). Dentistry and the behavioral-social sciences: An historical overview. Journal of Behavioral Medicine, 4, 247–256.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Istvan, J. (1986). Stress, anxiety, and birth outcomes: A critical review of the evidence. Psychological Bulletin, 100, 331–348.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Istvan, J., & Hatton, D. (1987). Curriculum of graduate training programs in health psychology. In G. C. Stone, S. M. Weiss, J. D. Matarazzo, N. E. Miller, J. Rodin, C. D. Belar, M. J. Follick, & J. E. Singer (Eds.), Health psychology: A discipline and a profession. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  6. Keefe, F. J. (1982). Behavioral assessment and treatment of chronic pain: Current status and future directions. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 50, 896–911.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Matarazzo, J. D. (1983). Education and training in health psychology: Boulder or bolder. Health Psychology, 2, 73–113.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Matarazzo, J. D. (1987). Relationships of health psychology to other segments of psychology. In G. C. Stone, S. M. Weiss, J. D. Matarazzo, N. E. Miller, J. Rodin, C. D. Belar, M. J. Follick, & J. E. Singer (Eds.), Health psychology: A discipline and a profession. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  9. Matthews, K. A., & Avis, N. E. (1982). Psychologists in schools of public health: Current status, future prospects and implications for other health settings. American Psychologist, 37, 949–954.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Melzack, R., & Wall, P. D. (1982). The challenge of pain. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  11. Raimy, V. C. (1950). Training in clinical psychology. New York: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
  12. Tanabe, G. (1982). The potential for public health psychology. American Psychologist, 37, 942–944.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joseph A. Istvan
    • 1
  • Joseph D. Matarazzo
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Medical PsychologySchool of Medicine, Oregon Health Sciences UniversityPortlandUSA

Personalised recommendations