Work Samples and Simulations in Competency Evaluation

  • Ann Howard

Abstract

The evaluation of student competence in clinical training is part of the broader issue of competency evaluation across a variety of professions. Many disciplines have similar needs to evaluate the application of skills as distinct from levels or scope of knowledge. Work samples and simulations offer alternative measurement methods to paper-and-pencil testing that can well be applied to skill application. The usefulness of such methods for evaluation of interactive skills is particularly appropriate to clinical training.

Keywords

Performance Test American Psychological Association Objective Structure Clinical Examination Oral Examination Work Sample 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ann Howard
    • 1
  1. 1.Human Resources ResearchAmerican Telephone and Telegraph Company (AT&T)New YorkUSA

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