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Criminal Law, Biological Psychiatry, and Premenstrual Syndrome: Conflicting Perspectives

  • C. R. Jeffery

Abstract

This paper is primarily devoted to a discussion of premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and its relationship to criminal law and the insanity defense. However, it is not possible to discuss PMS and criminal law without first establishing the exact nature and extent of PMS.

Keywords

Antisocial Behavior Criminal Justice System Criminal Behavior Crime Prevention Premenstrual Syndrome 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. R. Jeffery
    • 1
  1. 1.School of CriminologyFlorida State UniversityTallahasseeUSA

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