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The Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS) Label: Benefit or Burden?

  • Ruth Macklin

Abstract

Inquiry into the premenstrual syndrome (PMS) phenomenon raises a cluster of questions involving conceptual, scientific, moral, social, and legal concerns. The moral concerns might at first seem to be the only ones that directly raise ethical questions, but a closer look reveals that the conceptual, social, scientific, and legal issues also have ethical dimensions. It is by now a well accepted fact that science is not a value-free enterprise. Research into PMS and the proposed medical and social treatment of sufferers provides an illustrative case study of the ways in which value considerations pervade the domain of biomedical science, in both research and treatment.

Keywords

Deviant Behavior Premenstrual Syndrome Harm Principle Preventive Detention Minimal Brain Dysfunction 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ruth Macklin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Epidemiology and Social MedicineAlbert Einstein College of MedicineBronxUSA

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