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Carcinogenic Effects of Inhaled Radionuclides

  • R. O. McClellan
  • B. B. Boecker
  • F. F. Hahn
  • B. A. Muggenburg
  • R. G. Cuddihy
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 124)

Abstract

During the last two decades, a series of studies have been conducted at this Institute to examine the carcinogenic effects of inhaled radionuclides. A number of studies have been conducted with Beagle dogs exposed brieflv to aerosols of ß-emitters (90Y, 91Y, 14CE and 90Sr) and α-emitters (238Pu and 239pu) in particles having different in vivo solubilities. The exposure conditions have been varied to produce initial lung burdens ranging downward from those producing acute lethality to levels equivalent to maximum permissible lung burdens for man. Dependent upon the particle size, chemical element and solubility of the particles, the inhalation intakes have resulted in varying degrees of protracted radiation exposure of nasal cavity, lung, lung-associated lymph nodes, liver and skeleton. The animals have been observed for their life span and dose-related increases in cancer have been observed in the most heavily irradiated sites. Although some of the studies are still in progress, sufficient data is at hand to provide cancer risk estimators for a number of radiation exposure scenarios. Some exposed animals are still surviving and may provide material for studies that will aid in providing bridges between observations in molecular and cellular systems, whole animals and people.

Keywords

Liver Cancer Nasal Cavity Bone Cancer Relative Biological Effectiveness Beta Emitter 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. O. McClellan
    • 1
  • B. B. Boecker
    • 1
  • F. F. Hahn
    • 1
  • B. A. Muggenburg
    • 1
  • R. G. Cuddihy
    • 1
  1. 1.Lovelace Inhalation Toxicology Research InstituteAlbuquerqueUSA

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