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Dose-Incidence Relations for Radiation Carcinogenesis with Particular Reference to the Effects of High-Let Radiation

  • A. C. Upton
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 124)

Abstract

For many years, radiations of high linear energy transfer (LET) have been known to have a high relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for carcinogenic effects (1), in keeping with their high RBE for most other effects on living organisms (2–7). It has also been known that the RBE of high-LET radiations for carcinogenic effects generally increases with decreasing dose and dose rate (1, 6, 7).

Keywords

Dose Rate Linear Energy Transfer Relative Biological Effectiveness Radiological Protection Fission Neutron 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. C. Upton
    • 1
  1. 1.NYU Institute of Environmental MedicineNew YorkUSA

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