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Experimental Radiation Carcinogenesis

  • G. Silini
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 124)

Abstract

The risk assessment of radiation-induced cancer at the low doses delivered by environmental and occupational sources would be greatly facilitated by a more precise knowledge of the shapes of the dose-response functions. This knowledge is not available at present and is not likely to be obtained in the near future by direct observations. Two features of the dose-response relationships are most important for risk evaluation at low doses: the existence of a dose threshold and the general form of the curve.

Keywords

High Dose Rate Tumour Induction Fission Neutron Neutron Dose Reticulum Cell Sarcoma 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Silini
    • 1
  1. 1.United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR)Vienna International CentreViennaAustria

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