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Protein Phosphorylation and Phospholipid Metabolism in the Superior Cervical Ganglion

  • Robert L. Perlman
  • Anne L. Cahill
  • Joel Horwitz

Abstract

Our laboratory has been interested in the mechanisms by which neuronal activity regulates neuronal metabolism. Specifically, we have been studying the mechanisms by which neuronal activity regulates tyrosine hydroxylase (tyrosine 3-monooxygenase, EC 1.14.16.2) activity and catecholamine synthesis in the superior cervical ganglion (SCG). The SCG is a prototypical sympathetic ganglion. The noradrenergic principal neurons in this ganglion innervate the pineal gland, the salivary glands, the thyroid gland, smooth muscles of the iris, and blood vessels in the head and neck. These neurons are innervated by preganglionic sympathetic nerves whose cell bodies lie in the intermediolateral column of the spinal cord and which release acetylcholine (ACh) as their classical neurotransmitter. The principal ganglionic neurons contain both nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors. Stimulation of the nicotinic receptors produces a rapid depolarization that is due to a generalized increase in the permeability of the neurons to cations. Nicotinic stimulation typically leads to the generation of action potentials in the neurons. Stimulation of the muscarinic receptors produces a slower depolarization that is due at least in part to the inhibition of K+ efflux from the cells. These neurons also contain voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels; depolarization activates these channels and thereby causes an additional influx of Ca2x into the cells. Finally, the pre-ganglionic neurons contain a variety of peptides in addition to ACh; the physiological effects of these peptides have not yet been determined.

Keywords

Tyrosine Hydroxylase Superior Cervical Ganglion Muscarinic Agonist Phospholipid Metabolism Tyrosine Hydroxylase Activity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert L. Perlman
    • 1
  • Anne L. Cahill
    • 1
  • Joel Horwitz
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Physiology and BiophysicsUniversity of Illinois College of Medicine at ChicagoChicagoUSA

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