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Actions of Intravenous Eserine and Pyridostigmine on Cat Spinal Cord Renshaw Cells

  • William G. VanMeter
  • Karin C. VanMeter
  • Roderick C. Wierwille

Abstract

Protection from irreversible inhibition of cholinesterases (ChE) is afforded by pretreatment with a carbamate such as physostigmine (Koelle, 1946, 1957). This tertiary drug readily gains access to the CNS, and it has been shown to raise the LD50 in rats when given prior to toxic doses of potent, centrally acting irreversible inhibitors of ChEfs. Some protection from exposure to centrally-acting irreversible anticholinesterases (antiChE) also has been reported following pretreatment with pyridostigmine, a quaternary carbamate (Wolthuis and Vanwersch, 1984). Using indirect observations, these authors propose a CNS action of pyridostigmine.

Keywords

Atropine Sulfate Renshaw Cell Time Interval Histogram Methyl Nitrate Antidromic Stimulation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • William G. VanMeter
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Karin C. VanMeter
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Roderick C. Wierwille
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.College of Veterinary MedicineIowa State UniversityAmesUSA
  2. 2.Institute of Chemical DefenseUnited States Medical ResearchAPGUSA
  3. 3.Dept. of Pharmacology and Expt’l Therapeutics, School of MedicineUniversity of MarylandBaltimoreUSA

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