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Mipafox — Inhibitor of Cholinesterase, Neurotoxic Esterase, and DFP-ase: Is there a “Mipafox-ase”?

  • Francis C. G. Hoskin
  • Elwyn T. Reese
  • William J. Smith

Abstract

In 1946 there was published both the synthesis of the archetypal organophosphorus cholinesterase inhibitor, DFP,1 and the finding of an enzyme that hydrolyzes and thus detoxifies this compound.2 In 1963, in the same landmark volume to which Karczmar contributed two chapters on particular aspects of the acetylcholine system often elucidated by the use of DFP,3,4 Mounter5 reviewed the subject that has come to be known as “DFPase”. While a relationship of a compound that is an inhibitor of cholinesterase to an enzyme that hydrolyzes that compound will be self-evident, every imaginable aspect of the one enzyme is either understood or under study, whereas the other enzyme, seemingly without natural substrate or physiological role, may require some introduction.

Keywords

Organophosphorus Compound Squid Giant Axon Mammalian Kidney Penicillium Funiculosum Anticholinesterase Agent 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Francis C. G. Hoskin
    • 1
  • Elwyn T. Reese
    • 2
  • William J. Smith
    • 2
  1. 1.Biology DepartmentIllinois Institute of TechnologyChicagoUSA
  2. 2.Science and Advanced Technology LaboratoryU.S. Army Natick Research and Development CenterNatickUSA

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