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Modulation of Fatty Acid Synthesis in Plants by Thiolactomycin

  • Mitsuhiro Yamada
  • Misako Kato
  • Ikuo Nishida
  • Kazuo Kawano
  • Akihiko Kawaguchi
  • Tomoko Ehara

Abstract

The synthesis of fatty acids and lipids in plants are complicated because of involvement in both the chloroplast and the endoplastic reticulum for de novo synthesis, elongation and desaturation of fatty acids, accompanied by their esterification to glycerides. Nevertheless, a controlled flow of the metabolic path proceeds in a plant cell, as shown by a given ratio of lipid and fatty acid composition in a organelle membrane. Administration of the inhibitor for the synthesis of fatty acids and lipids is used as a tool to elucidate the mechanism of the controlled flow. However, even when an inhibitor is specific for a definite reaction of fatty acid synthesis, the effect of the inhibition on overall synthesis of fatty acids are different in different lipids and different plants. For example, cerulenin inhibits 3-ketoacyl-ACP synthase in de novo synthesis of fatty acids and not that in elongation of fatty acids2, but the effect of cerulenin on lipid synthesis in greening barley leaves indicates an increase of 16: 0 and a marked decrease of 18: 3 in MGDG, and conversely a decrease of 16: 0 and an increase of 18: 3 in PC, although the synthesis of both glycolipids and phospholipids are considerably inhibited3.

Keywords

Fatty Acid Composition Fatty Acid Synthesis Spinach Chloroplast Chase Experiment Greening Barley 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mitsuhiro Yamada
    • 1
  • Misako Kato
    • 1
  • Ikuo Nishida
    • 1
  • Kazuo Kawano
    • 1
  • Akihiko Kawaguchi
    • 1
  • Tomoko Ehara
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of BiologyThe University of TokyoTokyo 153Japan
  2. 2.Department of MicrobiologyTokyo Medical CollegeTokyo 160Japan

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