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Acyl Lipid Metabolism in Rhodotorula gracilis (CBS 3043) and the Effects of Methyl Sterculate on Fatty Acid Desaturation

  • C. E. Rolph
  • R. S. Moreton
  • I. S. Small
  • J. L. Harwood

Abstract

The oleaginous yeast, Rhodotorula gracilis (CBS 3043) is capable of accumulating large amounts of storage lipid when grown under nitrogen-limiting conditions. The storage lipids produced under these conditions are located in intracellular storage vesicles, and are primarily triacylglycerols. The major fatty acids present in the acyl lipids have been shown to be palmitic, stearic, oleic, linoleic and α-linolenic acids; indicating the presence of Δ9, A12 and Δ15 desaturase enzymes.

Keywords

Oleaginous Yeast Acyl Lipid Fatty Acid Desaturation Sterculic Acid Desaturase Enzyme 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. E. Rolph
    • 1
  • R. S. Moreton
    • 2
  • I. S. Small
    • 2
  • J. L. Harwood
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of BiochemistryUniversity CollegeCardiffUK
  2. 2.Cadbury-Schweppes PLCThe UniversityReadingUK

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