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Preliminary Characterization of Lipoxygenase from the Entomopathogenic Fungus Lagenidium giganteum

  • Christopher A. Simmons
  • James L. Kerwin
  • Robert K. Washino

Abstract

In many biological systems cell proliferation and differentiation are inhibited by polyunsaturated fatty acids and their oxidative metabolites (Gavino et al., 1981; Morisaki et al., 1984). Using developmentally synchronized cultures of Lagenidium giganteum (Oomycetes: Lagenidiales), a facultative parasite of mosquito larvae, it has been documented that oxidative lipid metabolism is necessary for the induction and maturation of its sexual stage, the oospore (Kerwin et al., 1986). These initial investigations, which used compounds known to selectively inhibit mammalian lipoxygenases and cyclooxygenases and partly purified eicosanoid extracts from L. giganteum cultures, demonstrated that oxygenase activity is associated with discrete developmental events and different oxidative metabolites appear to be produced during specific stages of fungal morphogenesis.

Keywords

Microsomal Fraction Mosquito Larva Diene Conjugation Oxidative Metabolite Oxygenase Activity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher A. Simmons
    • 1
  • James L. Kerwin
    • 1
  • Robert K. Washino
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EntomologyUniversity of CaliforniaDavisUSA

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