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Properties and in vitro Synthesis of Phospholipid Transfer Proteins

  • F. Tchang
  • F. Guerbette
  • D. Douady
  • M. Grosbois
  • C. Vergnolle
  • A. Jolliot
  • J. P. Dubacq
  • J. C. Kader

Abstract

Phospholipid transfer proteins (PLTP) have been isolated to homogeneity from various plant sources: spinach leaves1, maize seedlings2,3 and castor bean endosperm4. These proteins are able to facilitate an in vitro transfer of phospholipids between membranes. This led to the hypothesis that these proteins participate in vivo in the turnover and biogenesis of membranes5. In order to study the function of these proteins, it is essential to know their biochemical properties as well as their biogenesis. In this paper, we compare the properties of the transfer proteins isolated from the three tissues and we indicate new informations concerning the in vitro synthesis of the protein isolated from maize seedlings.

Keywords

Transfer Protein Phosphatidic Acid Maize Seedling Castor Bean Lipid Transfer Protein 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • F. Tchang
    • 1
  • F. Guerbette
    • 1
  • D. Douady
    • 1
  • M. Grosbois
    • 1
  • C. Vergnolle
    • 1
  • A. Jolliot
    • 1
  • J. P. Dubacq
    • 1
  • J. C. Kader
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire de Physiologie Cellulaire (U.A.CNRS 1180)Université P. et M. CurieParisFrance

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