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Regulation of Phospholipid Headgroup Composition in Castor Bean Endosperm

  • Thomas S. MooreJr.

Abstract

As a general rule, the phospholipid composition of cellular membranes, as defined by headgroups, is highly conserved. Repeated isolates of a membrane fraction at a given developmental stage will, within experimental error, provide the same phospholipid composition. On the other hand, there are reports that in some instances specific changes in phospholipid headgroup composition can take place as a response to environmental or hormonal influences. Indeed, in mammalian systems phosphatidylinositol metabolism responds dramatically to hormonal influences and has been demonstrated to be an intermediary in signal transmission2. These considerations lead to the conclusion that the phospholipid composition of cells must be highly regulated.

Keywords

Inositol Phosphate Phospholipid Composition Phospholipid Synthesis Endomembrane System Phosphatidylcholine Biosynthesis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Abbreviations

Eth

ethanolamine

Ins

inositol

Ser

serine

PC

phosphatidylcholine

PE

phosphatidylethanolamine

PG

phosphatidylglycerol

PI

phosphatidylinositol

BPG

bis-phosphatidylglycerol (cardiolipin)

PS

phosphatidylserine

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas S. MooreJr.
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of BotanyLouisiana State UniversityBaton RougeUSA

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