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Physiological and Transformational Analyses of Lipoxygenases

  • D. F. Hildebrand
  • M. Altschuler
  • G. Bookjans
  • G. Benzion
  • T. R. Hamilton-Kemp
  • R. A. Andersen
  • J. G. Rodriguez
  • J. C. Polacco
  • M. L. Dahmer
  • A. G. Hunt
  • X. Wang
  • G. B. Collins

Abstract

Lipoxygenases (LOXs) represent a group of polyunsaturated fatty acid oxidases that are apparently ubiquitious in eukaryotic organisms. There are a growing number of reports of the presence of this enzyme in various human and other animal tissues. The list of plants containing active LOXs also continues to expand.

Keywords

Soybean Seed Twospotted Spider American Chemical Society Symposium Series Seed Lipoxygenase Twospotted Spider Mite 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. F. Hildebrand
    • 1
  • M. Altschuler
    • 1
  • G. Bookjans
    • 1
  • G. Benzion
    • 1
  • T. R. Hamilton-Kemp
    • 1
  • R. A. Andersen
    • 1
  • J. G. Rodriguez
    • 1
  • J. C. Polacco
    • 2
  • M. L. Dahmer
    • 1
  • A. G. Hunt
    • 1
  • X. Wang
    • 1
  • G. B. Collins
    • 1
  1. 1.University of KentuckyLexingtonUSA
  2. 2.University of MissouriColumbiaUSA

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