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Oil Seed Rape Acyl Carrier Protein (ACP) Protein and Gene Structure

  • A. R. Slabas
  • J. Harding
  • P. Roberts
  • A. Hellyer
  • C. Sidebottom
  • C. G. Smith
  • R. Safford
  • J. de Silva
  • C. Lucas
  • J. Windust
  • C. M. James
  • S. G. Hughes

Abstract

Acyl carrier protein (ACP) plays a central rôle in lipid metabolism, serving as both a component of plant fatty acid synthetase (1) and as a substrate/cofactor for complex lipid biosynthesis (2). The protein has been purified from a number of plant sources and its amino acid sequence determined for the protein from both barley leaf (3) and spinach leaf (4) material. Both of these two previously mentioned sources of ACP have two detectable forms of the protein (5–6) whilst in seed material only one form has been detected (5). ACP has been shown, using immunological techniques, to be a developmentally regulated protein in maturing soy bean seeds. The activity of the protein appearing just prior to lipid accumulation (7). Despite the importance of this protein in lipid metabolism and the fact that seeds are a major site of lipid synthesis there is no reported literature on the characterization of ACP from seed material.

Keywords

Acyl Carrier Protein Seed Material Barley Leaf Detectable Form Spinach Leaf 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. R. Slabas
    • 1
  • J. Harding
    • 1
  • P. Roberts
    • 1
  • A. Hellyer
    • 1
  • C. Sidebottom
    • 1
  • C. G. Smith
    • 1
  • R. Safford
    • 1
  • J. de Silva
    • 1
  • C. Lucas
    • 1
  • J. Windust
    • 1
  • C. M. James
    • 1
  • S. G. Hughes
    • 1
  1. 1.Biosciences DivisionUnilever ResearchSharnbrook, BedfordUK

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