Advertisement

Acyl Carrier Protein as a Probe of the Molecular Biology of Plant Fatty Acid Synthesis

  • J. B. Ohlrogge
  • P. D. Beremand
  • D. J. Hannapel
  • D. J. Guerra
  • D. E. Elmore
  • D. N. Kuhn

Abstract

Acyl carrier protein (ACP) is the best characterized protein in plant lipid metabolism. The stability and relative ease of purification of ACP have resulted in it being the first protein of plant fatty acid synthesis (FAS) to be purified to homogeneity (1), to have specific antiserum raised against it (2), and to have amino acid sequence data available (3–5). To date, ACP has been purified from spinach, avocado, castor bean, barley, rapeseed and soybean (6, and J. Ohlrogge, unpublished data.)

Keywords

Fatty Acid Synthesis Acyl Carrier Protein Amino Acid Sequence Data Plant Fatty Acid Half Gene 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Simoni, R. D., Criddle, R. S., and Stumpf, P. K. (1967). J. Biol. Chem. 242, 573–58PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Ohlrogge, J, B., Kuhn, D.N., and Stumpf, P.K. (1979). Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., USA, 76(3), 1194–1198PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Matsamura, S., and Stumpf, P. K. (1968). Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 125, 932–941CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Kuo, T. M., and Ohlrogge, J. B. (1984). Arch. Biochem. Biophys. 234, 290–296PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Hoj, P. B., and Svendsen, I. (1983). Carlsberg Res. Commun. 48(4), 285–306CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Ohlrogge, J. B., The Biochemistry of Plant Acyl Carrier Proteins. In: The Biochemistry of Plants: A Comprehensive Treatise, P. K. Stumpf, editor, In pressGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Guerra, D. J., Ohlrogge, J. B., and Frentzen, M. (1986). Plant Physiol., in pressGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Ohlrogge, J. B., and Kuo, T. M. (1984a). Plant Physiol. (Bethesda) 74(3), 622–625CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Dome, A. J., Corde, J. P., Joyard, J., Borner, T., and Douce, R. (1982). Plant Physiol. 69, 1467–1470.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Cashmore, A., et al. (1985). Biotechnology 3, 803–808CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Ohlrogge, J. B., and Kuo, T. M. (1984). Spinach Acyl Carrier Proteins: Primary Structure, mRNA Translation and Immunoelectrophoretic Analysis. In: Structure, Function, and Metabolism of Plant Lipids. P. A. Siegenthaler and W. Eichenberger, eds. Elsevier Science Publishers, pp. 63-67Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Elhussein, S., Miernyk, J. A., and Ohlrogge, J. B. (1986). This Proceedings.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Hoj, P. B., and Svendsen, I. (1983). Carlsberg Res. Commun. 48(4), 285–306CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Ohlrogge, J. B., and Kuo, T. M. (1985). J. Biol. Chem. 260, 8032–8037PubMedGoogle Scholar
  15. 15.
    Ohlrogge, J. B., Beremand, P. D., Kuhn, D. N., and Parker, P. E. (1986). Biochemical Society Trans. 14, 579–581Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. B. Ohlrogge
    • 1
  • P. D. Beremand
    • 1
  • D. J. Hannapel
    • 1
  • D. J. Guerra
    • 1
  • D. E. Elmore
    • 1
  • D. N. Kuhn
    • 2
  1. 1.Northern Regional Research Center, Agricultural Research ServiceU.S. Department of AgriculturePeoriaUSA
  2. 2.Purdue UniversityWest LafayetteUSA

Personalised recommendations