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Peripheral Metabolism of Thyroid Hormones in Congenital Thyroid Hormone Transport Abnormalities: Familial Dysalbuminemic Hyperthyroxinemia and TBG Increase

  • Romano Bianchi
  • Giorgio Iervasi
  • Alessandro Pilo
  • Nicola Molea
  • Marco Ferdeghini
  • Franco Cazzuola
  • Gianfranco Giraudi

Abstract

Familial dysalbuminemic hyperthyroxinemia (FDH) and inherited increase of thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) in plasma are two very uncommon thyronine serum-binding protein abnormalities that cause hyperthyroxinemia without hyperthyroidism. In FDH, subjects have an abnormal albumin molecule which shows increased affinity only for thyroxine (T4). As a result, serum total T4 (TT4) value is increased, while the serum total triiodothyronine (TT3) concentration is normal or slightly elevated. Nevertheless, the increase in the free T4 index frequently leads to an erroneous diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis. On the contrary, in the inherited high TBG syndrome, proportionate increments in serum TT4 and TT3 concentrations are seen because TBG has a high affinity for T4, as well as T3, whereas the free T4 index remains normal.

Keywords

Affinity Constant Familial Dysalbuminemic Hyperthyroxinemia Serum Total Triiodothyronine Congenital Elevation Abnormal Serum Albumin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Romano Bianchi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Giorgio Iervasi
    • 1
    • 2
  • Alessandro Pilo
    • 1
    • 2
  • Nicola Molea
    • 1
    • 2
  • Marco Ferdeghini
    • 1
    • 2
  • Franco Cazzuola
    • 1
    • 2
  • Gianfranco Giraudi
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, Cattedra di Patologia Medica VUniversity of PisaPisaItaly
  2. 2.Institute for Analytical ChemistryUniversity of TurinTurinItaly

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