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Glucagon Causes Disappearance of a T3 and Carbohydrate-Inducible Rat Hepatic mRNA (mRNAS14): Unexpected Circadian Dependency of Response

  • William B. Kinlaw
  • Howard C. Towle
  • Teh-Yi Tao
  • Donald B. Jump
  • Harold L. Schwartz
  • Cary N. Mariash
  • Jack H. Oppenheimer

Abstract

We have employed a rat hepatic mRNA sequence (mRNAS14) as a model for studies of hormonal and nutrient effects on the regulation of gene expression in vivo. Attention was drawn to this sequence, which encodes a cytosolic protein of Mr 17,010, pl 4.9, because of its rapid induction to 15X the basal hypothyroid level within 4 h after T3 administration (1). Subsequent studies showed that hepatic mRNAS14 expression is regulated by other factors as well. Starvation or experimental diabetes mellitus, for example, markedly attenuate mRNAS14 levels, whereas carbohydrate feeding augments mRNAS14 (2,3). Moreover, Mariash et al. in our laboratory have shown that induction of this mRNA by T3 and dietary carbohydrate exhibits the synergistic action which typifies their induction of several lipogenic enzymes in rat liver (2,4,5). The hypothesis has been advanced that a product of carbohydrate metabolism interacts in a multiplicative fashion with a signal generated by the association of T3 with its receptor to induce specific mRNA sequences encoding lipogenic enzymes. Participation of the S14 protein in lipogenesis is further suggested by its abundancy only in lipogenic tisses—liver, fat, and lactating mammary gland (5).

Keywords

Dietary Carbohydrate Circadian Variation Lipogenic Enzyme Experimental Diabetes Mellitus Carbohydrate Feeding 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. 1.
    Seelig S, Jump DB, Oppenheimer JH, et al. Endocrinology 110: 671, 1982.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Liaw C, Seelig S, Towle HC, et al. Biochem 22: 213, 1983.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Carr FE, Bingham C, Oppenheimer JH, et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 81: 974, 1984.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Mariash CN, Kaiser FE, Schwartz HL, et al. J Clin Invest 65: 1126, 1980.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Jump DB and Oppenheimer JH. Endocrinology, in press.Google Scholar
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    Mariash CN, Seelig S, and Oppenheimer JH. Anal Biochem 121: 388, 1982.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • William B. Kinlaw
    • 1
  • Howard C. Towle
    • 1
  • Teh-Yi Tao
    • 1
  • Donald B. Jump
    • 1
  • Harold L. Schwartz
    • 1
  • Cary N. Mariash
    • 1
  • Jack H. Oppenheimer
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Medicine and BiochemistryUniversity of MinnesotaMinneapolisUSA

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