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Thyroxine-Induced Molting and Gonadal Functions of Laying Hens

  • Kunitoshi Sekimoto
  • Keiko Imai
  • Mitsuo Suzuki
  • Hiroo Takikawa
  • Nobuyuki Hoshino

Abstract

In most avian species, molting and feather regeneration are related to breeding or seasonal changes. In addition to spontaneous molting, forced molting of laying domestic fowls is induced by a combination of food-water restriction and short photoperiod or excess dose of thyroxine (T4), followed by a reduction in egg production rate. The forced molting technique is used to avoid replacing pullets every year, although during the molting the rate of egg production is nearly zero. It has been proposed that changes in various endocrine functions are involved in both spontaneous and forced molting (1–9).

Keywords

Progesterone Level Short Photoperiod Excess Dose Gonadal Function Domestic Fowl 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kunitoshi Sekimoto
    • 1
    • 2
  • Keiko Imai
    • 1
    • 2
  • Mitsuo Suzuki
    • 1
    • 2
  • Hiroo Takikawa
    • 1
    • 2
  • Nobuyuki Hoshino
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Institute of EndocrinologyGunma UniversityMaebashiJapan
  2. 2.Central Research Institute of Nihon Nosan Koguo K.K.FunabashiJapan

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