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Effects of Synthetic Iodolipids on Thyroid Function “In Vitro”: Possible Role in Thyroid Regulation

  • Mario A. Pisarev
  • Gregorio D. Chazenbalk
  • Leon Krawiec
  • Renata M. Valsecchi
  • Priscila Busse Grawitz
  • Guillermo J. Juvenal
  • Gerardo Burton

Abstract

The inhibitory effects of iodine on the thyroid are mediated by an iodine organic intermediate (see review, 1), whose chemical nature is not known. Although thyroid hormones have been proposed to be such intermediates, their role is still controversial (see ref. 2 for discussion). It is known that, in addition to thyroid hormones, the gland is capable of synthesizing iodolipids (see review, 3), another type of organic iodocompounds. We have recently shown that iodinated free fatty acids comprise most of the iodolipids (4). The results obtained with different inhibitors of arachidonic acid metabolism suggested that iodinated derivatives of arachidonic acid may be a component of iodinated free fatty acids. Moreover, recent data from our laboratory has shown that in calf thyroid slides incubated with 125I, the incorporation of radioiodine into 15-iodo14-hydroxy- and 15-hydroxy-14-iodo-eicosatrienoic acid (I-OH-A) and the corresponding lactones was observed (to be published). Boeynaems and Hubbard (5) have also shown that rat thyroid produces the acid 5-iodo-6hydroxy-eicosatrienoic 8,11,14 delta lactone (IL-δ). In a previous publication, we have demonstrated that a semi-purified preparation of iodoarachidonate inhibits in vitro different thyroid parameters (6). We have also shown that studies with pure preparations of I-OH-A and another derivative with an iodine atom in position 6 (IL-δ).

Keywords

Arachidonic Acid Thyroid Hormone Iodine Uptake Iodine Atom Arachidonic Acid Metabolism 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mario A. Pisarev
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Gregorio D. Chazenbalk
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Leon Krawiec
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Renata M. Valsecchi
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Priscila Busse Grawitz
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Guillermo J. Juvenal
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Gerardo Burton
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  1. 1.Division Bioquimica NuclearComision Nacional de Energia AtomicaBuenos AiresArgentina
  2. 2.Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y NaturalesUniversidad de Buenos AiresBuenos AiresArgentina
  3. 3.Consejo Nacional de Investigaciones Cientificas y TecnicasBuenos AiresArgentina

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