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Sex Differences in the Use of Health Services

  • Ronald Kessler

Abstract

It is widely known that women have much higher rates of physician utilization than men. This is true even when pregnancy-related visits are taken out of consideration (Nathanson, 1977). It might be that this difference accurately describes the higher rates of ill health experienced by women, but proponents of an illness behaviour perspective argue that it also reflects a more active female response to symptoms (Mechanic, 1976). This argument is consistent with the fact that women are much more likely than men to present with complaints of mild symptoms (Verbrugge, 1976). Discretion in seeking professional help for symptoms of this sort is high (Mechanic, 1978).

Keywords

Doctor Visit Illness Behaviour Epidemiologic Catchment Area Sick Role Role Flexibility 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ronald Kessler
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Social ResearchThe University of MichiganUSA

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