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Illness Behaviour: Operationalization of the Biopsychosocial Model

  • Sean McHugh
  • Michael Vallis

Abstract

The management of illness behaviour has become a major area of interest, as well as a significant challenge, for the health and social sciences. Despite the amount of attention paid to illness behaviour, it is an area which is poorly understood and many (including patients, health care providers, social scientists, and health care systems analysts) might argue, is not effectively managed. In this chapter, the essential components of an illness behaviour model will be outlined, drawing upon he concepts of the various health and social sciences. This model is intended to facilitate effective and integrative management of the myriad of factors relevant to illness behaviour.

Keywords

Social Support Behavioral Medicine Explanatory Model Psychosomatic Medicine Cognitive Appraisal 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sean McHugh
    • 1
  • Michael Vallis
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Medicine and PsychiatryUniversity of TorontoCanada

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