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Psychosocial Treatment of Anxiety Disorders

  • G. Terence Wilson

Abstract

The purpose of this chapter is not to attempt a comprehensive analysis of the cognitive-behavioral treatment of anxiety disorders. There are simply too many different strategies and techniques to incorporate into the present chapter. Nor is an attempt made to cover the full range of anxiety disorders. Rather, the chapter focuses on some current treatment issues, which, it can be argued, are of particular conceptual and clinical importance. The chapter draws mainly on the treatment of agoraphobia and panic. One reason for this choice is the clinical significance of agoraphobia and panic disorders, as well as the fact that a good deal is already known about the treatment of agoraphobia from a cognitive-behavioral perspective so that it provides a useful framework for examining relevant conceptual issues. Much of what is said here is directly applicable to other complex anxiety-based problems.

Keywords

Anxiety Disorder Social Learning Social Learning Theory Exposure Treatment Phobic Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Terence Wilson
    • 1
  1. 1.Rutgers UniversityUSA

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