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Anxiety Disorders: Future Directions and Closing Comments

  • T. Michael Vallis
  • Zindel V. Segal

Abstract

Given that our knowledge of the nature and treatment of the anxiety disorders has grown exponentially over the past few years, the purpose of this text has been to present a comprehensive picture of the current state of the field. At the level of classification/ assessment, Spitzer has outlined the proposed revisions to the DSM-III anxiety disorders category. The revised classification system is somewhat controversial in that panic disorder is elevated to a much more central role than it has had in the past.

Keywords

Anxiety Disorder Generalize Anxiety Disorder Response Mode Panic Disorder Cognitive Therapy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Michael Vallis
    • 1
    • 2
  • Zindel V. Segal
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Clarke Institute of PsychiatryUSA
  2. 2.University of TorontoCanada

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