Advertisement

Host Factors in Nuclear Plasmid Maintenance in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

  • Bik-Kwoon Tye
  • Pratima Sinha
  • Richard Surosky
  • Susan Gibson
  • Gregory Maine
  • Shlomo Eisenberg
Part of the Basic Life Sciences book series (BLSC, volume 40)

Abstract

In yeast, the initiation of DNA replication on chromosomes is believed to occur at specific sequences known as autonomously replicating sequences (ARSs). We previously isolated a number of mutants that are defective in the maintenance of minichromosomes. Analysis of these mutants suggests that although ARSs differ greatly from one another in their primary sequences, they appear to share a common enzyme complex for the initiation of DNA replication. However, this initiation enzyme complex probably binds with differential affinity to different ARSs. This idea is corroborated by our identification of an ARS-binding protein that binds to different ARSs with different efficiencies.

Keywords

Replication Origin Complementation Group Linear Plasmid Differential Affinity Decyl Sulfate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Beach, D., M. Piper, and S. Shall (1980) Isolation of chromosomal origins of replication in yeast. Nature 254:185.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Berman, J., C.Y. Tachibana, and B.-K. Tye (1986) Identification of a telomere-binding protein in yeast. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., USA 83: 3713.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Broach, J.R., Y.-Y. Li, J. Feldman, M. Jayaram, J. Abraham, K.A. Nasmyth, and J.B. Hicks (1983) Location and sequence analysis of yeast origins of DNA replication. Cold Spring Harbor Symp. Quant. Biol. 47:1165.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    Celniker, S.E., and J.L. Campbell (1982) Yeast DNA replication in vitro: Initiation and elongation events mimic in vivo processes. Cell 31:201.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Chan, C.S.M., and B.-K. Tye (1980) Autonomously replicating sequences in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., USA 77:6329.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Chan, C.S.M., and B.-K. Tye (1983) Organization of DNA sequences. Cell 33:563.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Clarke, L., and J. Carbon (1980) Isolation of a yeast centromere and construction of functional small circular chromosomes. Nature 287:504.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Gibson, S., R. Surosky, P. Sinha, G.T. Maine, and B.-K. Tye (1986) Complexity of the enzyme system for the initiation of DNA replication in yeast. ICN-UCLA Symp. Mol. Cell. Biol. Vol. 47 (in press). Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    Johnson, A.D., B.J. Meyer, and M. Ptashne (1979) Interactions between DNA-bound repressors govern regulation by the λ phage repressor. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., USA 76:5061.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Kojo, H., B.D. Greenberg, and A. Sugino (1981) Yeast 2-ym plasmid DNA replication in vitro: Origin and direction. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., USA 78:7261.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Maine, G.T., P. Sinha, and B.-K. Tye (1984) Mutants of S . cerevisiae defective in the maintenance of minichromosomes. Genetics 106:365.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Maxam, A.M., and W. Gilbert (1977) A new method for sequencing DNA. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., USA 74:560.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Murray, A.W., and J.W. Szostak (1983) Pedigree analysis of plasmid segregation in yeast. Cell 34:961.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    Newlon, C.S., and W. Burke (1980) Replication of small chromosomal DNAs in yeast. ICN-UCLA Symp. Mol. Cell. Biol. 19:399.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Newlon, C.S., R.J. Devenish, P.A. Suci, and C.J. Roffis (1981) Replication origins used in vivo in yeast. ICN-UCLA Symp. Mol. Cell. Biol. 22:501.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    Osley, M.A., and L. Hereford (1982) Identification of a sequence responsible for periodic synthesis of yeast histone 2A mRNA. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., USA 79:7689.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. 17.
    Petes, T.D. (1979) Yeast ribosomal DNA genes are located on chromosome XII. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., USA 76:4106.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. 18.
    Saffer, L., and O.L. Miller, Jr. (1986) Electron microscopic study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae rDNA chromatin replication. Mol. Cell. Biol. 6:1148.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    Sinha, P., V. Chang, and B.-K. Tye (1986) A mutant which affects the function of autonomously replicating sequences in yeast. J. Mol. Biol. (in press).Google Scholar
  20. 20.
    Stinchcomb, D.T., K. Struhl, and R.W. Davis (1979) Isolation and characterization of a yeast chromosomal replicator. Nature 282:39.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    Struhl, K., D.T. Stinchcomb, S. Scherer, and R.W. Davis (1979) Isolation and characterization of a yeast chromosomal replicator. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., USA 76:1035.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. 22.
    Zakian, V.A., and J. Scott (1982) Construction, replication, and chromatin structure of TRP1 RI circle, a multiple-copy synthetic plasmid derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosomal DNA. Mol. Cell. Biol. 2:221.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bik-Kwoon Tye
    • 1
  • Pratima Sinha
    • 1
  • Richard Surosky
    • 1
  • Susan Gibson
    • 1
  • Gregory Maine
    • 1
  • Shlomo Eisenberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Section of Biochemistry, Molecular and Cell BiologyCornell UniversityIthacaUSA

Personalised recommendations