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Examination of Tool Marks in the Scanning Electron Microscope

  • R. P. Singh

Abstract

Examination of tool marks in cases relating to theft, burglary, violence and other criminal offenses is frequently carried out by a forensic scientist. Tool marks are produced on a softer surface by a tool of harder material, while commissioning a crime. The tool is not damaged in the process of cutting or scratching the surface of the material to any appreciable extent. The marks on the surface are reproducible. Thus, a criminal can be linked to a crime through the examination of the tool recovered from the criminal and the tool marks collected from the scene. Although the marks of fairly large size (over a few microns) can be seen under an optical microscope with an optimal magnification of 2000X, the marks of smaller dimensions (below one micrometer) can not be revealed. This is a situation where the application of the scanning electron microscope is called upon.

Keywords

Surface Irregularity Aluminum Wire Tool Mark Indentation Mark Fine Striation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. P. Singh
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Science and TechnologyGovernment of IndiaNew DelhiIndia

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