Liver Tissue Preparation Using a Modified Cryoultramicrotomy Kit

  • Patrick J. Clark
  • James R. Millette
  • Allan L. Allenspach
  • Paul T. McCauley
  • Isaac S. Washington

Abstract

The great potential of cryoultramicrotomy is that it is possible to observe the morphology of a sample in the electron microscope while at the same time analyze for its elemental composition using x-ray microanalysis. There are other methods using indirect means of studying the chemical composition of cell organelles, such as digestion and centrifugation, but cryoultramicrotomy is the only direct method. This unique ability will make cryoultramicrotomy a vital tool in the field of cell biology and pathology in the near future. Our interest is the quantitative analyses of diffusible elements in the mitochondria of rat liver before and after exposure to toxins both singularly and in mixtures. To obtain reliable and reproducible data it is critical that each step in the technique be carried out correctly. Any deviation in any of the steps will leave the final results in doubt.

Keywords

Migration Phosphorus Glycerol Acetone Citrate 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Patrick J. Clark
    • 1
  • James R. Millette
    • 1
  • Allan L. Allenspach
    • 2
  • Paul T. McCauley
    • 1
  • Isaac S. Washington
    • 1
  1. 1.Toxicology and Microbiology Division Health Effects Research LaboratoryU.S. Environmental Protection AgencyCincinnatiUSA
  2. 2.Department of ZoologyMiami UniversityOxfordUSA

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