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Antiviral Approaches in the Treatment of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome

  • P. Chandra
  • A. Chandra
  • I. Demirhan
  • T. Gerber
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 120)

Abstract

Acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) was first recognized in 1981 as an unexplained progressive immunodeficiency disorder associated with opportunistic infections (1) and Kaposi’s sarcoma (2). Not knowing the nature of the etiological agent at that time, the therapeutic approaches were devised to treat the opportunistic infections and/or Kaposi’s sarcoma; reconstitute the immunological status by bone marrow transplantation or adaptive transfer of immune competent cells; and through immunological enhancement using cytokines such as, Interleukin 2 and interferons, or immunogenic adjuvants. The identification of a virus associated to AIDS in the years 1983 (3) and 1984 (4,5,6), has provided important strategies in the diagnosis and treatment of this disease.

Keywords

Acquire Immunodeficiency Syndrome Reverse Transcriptase Activity Avian Leukosis Virus Polycytidylic Acid Template Primer 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Chandra
    • 1
  • A. Chandra
    • 1
  • I. Demirhan
    • 1
  • T. Gerber
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of Molecular Biology, Center of Biological ChemistryUniversity Medical SchoolFrankfurt/Main 70Germany

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