Advertisement

The Role of the State

  • Judy E. Hall

Abstract

This chapter summarizes state governments’ influence on mental health services, giving examples of and providing a rationale for the methods that the states have used. Because the state’s mechanism for affecting change is through legislation and the accompanying rules and regulations, we will focus on examples of legislation, the intent of which is to affect, directly or indirectly, the provision of mental health services. This legislation may be in the form of a licensure or a certification bill that regulates the mental health professions. Once licensure is in place, legislation may establish a mechanism for determinating the provider of services, the payment of services, or the evaluation of services (Kelvorick, 1981).

Keywords

Mental Health Mental Health Service American Psychological Association Health Service Provider Psychological Service 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. American Association of State Psychology Boards. (1983). Newsletter. (Available from AASPB, PO Box 4389, Montgomery, AL 36104.)Google Scholar
  2. American Medical Association. (1983). Continuing medical education fact sheet. Chicago: Author.Google Scholar
  3. American Nurses Association, (no date). Certification: Become the professional’s professional. Kansas City, MO: Author.Google Scholar
  4. American Psychological Association. (1974). Standards for providers of psychological services. Washington, DC: Author.Google Scholar
  5. American Psychological Association. (1977). Standards for providers of psychological services(rev. ed.). Washington, DC: Author.Google Scholar
  6. American Psychological Association. (1979). Criteria for accreditation of doctoral training programs and internship in professional psychology. Washington, DC: Author.Google Scholar
  7. American Psychological Association. (1981a). Ethical principles of psychologists(rev.). Washington, DC: Author.Google Scholar
  8. American Psychological Association. (1981b). Specialty guidelines for the delivery of services. Washington, DC: Author.Google Scholar
  9. American Psychological Association. (1985a). Standards for educational and psychological tests. Washington, DC: Author.Google Scholar
  10. American Psychological Association. (1985b). Summary of state laws regulating psychological practice through licensure. (Available from APA, 1200 Seventeenth St. N.W., Washington, DC 20036.)Google Scholar
  11. American Psychological Association, Council of Representatives. (1985c, February). Minutes. Washington, DC: Author.Google Scholar
  12. American Psychological Association. (1986). APA accredited doctoral programs in professional psychology. American Psychologist, 40, 1392–1398.Google Scholar
  13. American Psychological Association. (1987). General guidelines for providers of psychological services. (Available from APA, 1200 Seventeenth Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20036.)Google Scholar
  14. Annotation. (1980). A.L.R.3d, 21, 953-955.Google Scholar
  15. Brinkley, J. (1985). U.S., industry and physicians attack medical malpractice & medical discipline laws: Confusion reigns. The New York Times, (December 2-3), pp. 1, 10, & 1, B6.Google Scholar
  16. Carroll, S. L., & Gatson, R. J. (1983). Occupational licensing and the quality of service: An overview. Law and Human Behavior, 7, 139–146.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Cavalier, A. R., & McCarver, R. B. (1981). Wyatt v. Stickney and mentally retarded individuals. Mental Retardation, 19, 209–214.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  18. Common Cause. (1982). Going public: Consumer advocates on California’s professional licensing boards. (Available from Common Cause, 636 S. Hobart Blvd. No. 226, Los Angeles, CA 90005.)Google Scholar
  19. Council for the National Register of Health Service Providers. (1985a). Designated programs in psychology. (Available from the Council, 1200 Seventeenth St., N.W., Washington, DC 20036.)Google Scholar
  20. Council for the National Register of Health Service Providers in Psychology. (1985b). National register of health service providers in psychology. Washington, DC: Author.Google Scholar
  21. Dent v. West Virginia. (1889). 129 US 114, 32 L. Ed. 623, 9 S. Ct. 231.Google Scholar
  22. Derbyshire, R. C. (1983). How effective is medical self-regulation? Law and Human Behavior, 7, 193–202.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Dolan, A. K., & Urban, N. D. (1983). The determinants of the effectiveness of medical disciplinary boards: 1960-1977. Law and Human Behavior, 7, 203–218.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Dorken, H. (1986). Professional psychology in transaction. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  25. Dvorak, E. M., Kane, M. T., Laskevich, L. A., & Showalter, R. E. (1982). The National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses. Chicago: Chicago Review Press.Google Scholar
  26. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Civil Service Commission, Department of Labor and Department of Justice. (1978). Adoption by four agencies of Uniform Guidelines on Employee Selection Procedures. Federal Register, 43, 38290–38315.Google Scholar
  27. Federation of State Medical Boards of the US, Inc. (1983, January 1). Membership list. (Available from the Federation, 2630 West Freeway, Suite 138, Fort Worth, TX 76102.)Google Scholar
  28. Gabel, J., & Ermann, D. (1985). Preferred provider organizations: Performance, problems, and promises. Health Affairs, 4, 24–40.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Ginsberg, M. R., & Buklad, W. (1983, January). Memo to State Psychological Associations.(Available from APA.)Google Scholar
  30. Governor’s Select Commission on the Future of the State-Local Mental Health System. (1984, July). The future of the state-local mental health system (final report).(Available from Patricia Lamphear, Empire State Plaza, Corning Tower Building, No. 1455, Albany, NY 12229.)Google Scholar
  31. Hall, J. E. (1983). Respecialization, licensure and ethical conduct. The Clinical Psychologist, 36(3), 68–71.Google Scholar
  32. Hall, J. E. (1985a, August). Credentials in clinical psychology: Licenses, registries, diplomas and certificates. Paper presented at the annual convention of the American Psychology Association, Los Angeles.Google Scholar
  33. Hall, J. E. (1985b). The ABPP diploma privilege: Does it really exist? Professional Practice of Psychology, 6, 251–2Google Scholar
  34. Hall, J. E. (1986). Issues and procedures in the disciplining of psychologists. In R. Kilburg, R. Thorenson, & P. Nathan (Eds.), Professionals in distress: Issues, syndromes, and solutions in psychology. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.Google Scholar
  35. Hall, J. E. (1987). Licensure and certification of psychologists. In B. Edelstein & E. Berler (Eds.), Evaluation and accountability in clinical training. New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  36. Herbsleb, J. D., Sales, B. D., & Overcast, T. D. (1985). Challenging licensure and certification. American Psychologist, 40, 1165–1178.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  37. Hubbard, J. P. (1978). Measuring medical education: The tests and the experiences of the National Board of Medical Examiners(2nd ed.). Philidelphia: Lea & Febiger.Google Scholar
  38. Kane, M. T. (1982). The validity of licensure examinations. American Psychologist, 37, 911–918.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Kelvorick, A. K. (1981) Regulation and cost containment. In T. McGuire & B. A. Weisbrod (Eds.), Economics and mental health(DHHS Publication No. ADM 81-1114). Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.Google Scholar
  40. Loveland, E. (1977). Alternatives and innovations. In Proceedings of a national conference for evaluation competence in the health professions. (Available from Professional Examination Service, 475 Riverside Drive, New York City, 10017.)Google Scholar
  41. McGuire, T., & Weisbrod, B. A. (1981). NIMH Conference on economics and mental health: Introduction. In T. McGuire & B. A. Weisbrod (Eds.), Economics and mental health(DHHS Publication No. ADM 81-1114). Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.Google Scholar
  42. Midwestern Psychological Services, Inc. v. Potts. (1980). Unpublished opinion. Ohio Appellate Court. National Association of Social Workers. (1976). Standards for the regulation of social work practice. (Available from NASW, 7981 Eastern Ave., Silver Spring, MD 20910.)Google Scholar
  43. National Association of Social Workers. (1978). Standards for social work services in schools. (Available from NASW.)Google Scholar
  44. National Association of Social Workers. (1981) Standards for social work in health care settings. (Available from NASW.)Google Scholar
  45. National Association of Social Workers. (1982a). NASW register of clinical social workers. Silver Spring, MD: Author.Google Scholar
  46. National Association of Social Workers. (1984, July), State comparison of laws regulating social work. (Available from NASW.)Google Scholar
  47. National Commission for Health Certifying Agencies. (1985, November 15). The state of the art: Continuing competence assurance(draft report). (Available from NCHCA, 1101 30th St., N.W., Suite 108, Washington, DC 20007.)Google Scholar
  48. National Council of State Boards of Nursing. (1984, January). Survey. (Available from National Council, 303 East Ohio, Suite 2010, Chicago, 60611.)Google Scholar
  49. National Mental Health Association. (1983, September). Addendum to for ayes only. (Available from NMHA, 1800 N. Kent St., Arlington, VA 22209.)Google Scholar
  50. Nelson, S. H. (1979). Standards affecting mental health care: A review and commentary. American Journal of Psychiatry, 3(3), 303–307.Google Scholar
  51. New York State Commission on Quality of Care for the Mentally Disabled. (1982). Annual report: 1981-82. (Available from the Commission, 99 Washington Avenue, Albany, NY 12210.)Google Scholar
  52. New York State Education Department. (1982). Annual report on the professions. (Available from the Office of the Professions, Cultural Education Center, Albany, NY 12230.)Google Scholar
  53. Paxton, A. (Ed.). (1985, September). Malpractice crisis: How is it related to competence? Professional Regulation News, pp. 1-2.Google Scholar
  54. Office of Mental Health. (1984, October). Five year comprehensive plan for mental health services: 1985-1990. (Available from Office of Mental Health, 44 Holland Avenue, Albany, NY 12229.)Google Scholar
  55. Overcast, T. D., & Sales, B. D. (1985). Antitrust and malpractice implications of specialty recognition. Unpublished manuscript.Google Scholar
  56. Reaves, R. P. (1982). Regulating the professions: A legal and legislative handbook. (Available from author, PO Box 4389, Montgomery, AL 36104.)Google Scholar
  57. Richman, S. (1982). Final report to the AASPB on the role delineation study for the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology. (Available from American Association of State Psychology Boards, PO Box 4389, Montgomery, AL 36104.)Google Scholar
  58. Rosenfeld, M., Shimberg, B., & Thorton, R. F. (1984). Job analysis of licensed psychologists in the United States and Canada. (Available from American Association of State Psychology Boards, PO Box 4389, Montgomery, AL 36104.)Google Scholar
  59. Schnaps, L. S., & Sales, B. D. (1985). Specialization in Psychology: Lessons from other professions. Unpublished manuscript.Google Scholar
  60. Sechrest, L., & Hoffman, P. E. (1982). The philosophical underpinnings of peer review. Professional Psychology, 13, 14–18.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  61. Shimberg, B. (1982). Occupational licensing: A public perspective. Princeton, NJ: Center for Occupational and Professional Assessment.Google Scholar
  62. Simon, G. C (1983). Psychology, professional practice, and the public interest. In B. D. Sales (Ed.), The professional psychologist’s handbook. New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  63. Stigall, T. T. (1983). Licensing and certification. In B. D. Sales (Ed.), The professional psychologist’s handbook. New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  64. Theaman, M. (1982). A critical appraisal of Daniel Hogan’s position on licensure. Professional Practice of Psychology, 3(1), 1–18.Google Scholar
  65. U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. (1967). Report of the National Advisory Committee on Health Manpower. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.Google Scholar
  66. U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. (1971). Report on licensure and related health personnel credentialing(DHEW Publication No. 72-11). Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.Google Scholar
  67. U.S. Department of Health, Education, and Welfare. (1977). Credentialing health manpower(DHEW Publication No. [05] 77-1500571. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.Google Scholar
  68. Wellner, A. M. (Ed.). (1978) Education and credentialing in psychology. Washington, DC: Steering Committee of APA, AASPB and National Register.Google Scholar
  69. Wolgemuth, R. R., & Samph, T. (1983). Content validity study in support of licensure examination program of the American Association of State Social Work Boards. (Available from AASSWB, 6404 Garners Ferry Road, Columbia, SC 29209.)Google Scholar
  70. Wyatt v. Aderholt, 503 F. 2d 1305 (5th Cir. 1974).Google Scholar
  71. Wyatt v. Stickney, 344 F. Supp. 373 (M.D. Ala. 1972).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • Judy E. Hall
    • 1
  1. 1.New York State Education DepartmentCultural Education CenterAlbanyUSA

Personalised recommendations