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Abstract

Chronic pain problems are a major source of referrals for psychologists and other mental-health professionals in medical settings. Whether as a member of a liaison-consultation team, a pain clinic staff, or as a private consultant to a physician, the psychologist’s role vis-à-vis medicine has changed markedly in the past decade. Although the psychological aspects of disease and illness have been acknowledged for centuries, the role of the psychologist in the treatment process has only recently emerged. With the application of behavioral technology, often developed by psychologists, to clinical medicine (Doleys, Meredith, & Ciminero, 1982; Ferguson & Taylor, 1981; Katz & Zlutnick, 1975), psychologists now find themselves in a major consulting position on the health care team in an environment brimming with vague terminology, muliple (often conflicting) diagnoses, and a plethora of treatment modalities, ranging from simple bed rest to life-threatening surgical procedures.

Keywords

Chronic Pain Nerve Root Nucleus Pulposus Disc Disease Chronic Pain Patient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Steven Zlutnick
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.San Francisco Institute of Behavioral Medicine and TherapyGarden Sullivan HospitalSan FranciscoUSA
  2. 2.University of San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA

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