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Abstract

The term affective disorders encompasses a variety of conditions in which the principal disturbance involves mood and affect. They include disorders commonly referred to as clinical depressions, as well as manic and hypomanic states. It is now recognized that the affective disorders constitute the most common set of emotional conditions for which individuals seek consultation from mental health providers or general medical practitioners. A number of recent epidemiological surveys confirm that affective disorders are also common among the general population: approximately 5% are depressed at any given time, and as much as 20% of the total population experiences a clinical depression at some point during the life-span (see Boyd & Weissman, 1981). Thus, knowledge of methods for the assessment and treatment of affective disorders is essential for all mental health practitioners.

Keywords

Major Depression Affective Disorder American Psychiatric Association Manic Episode Lithium Treatment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael E. Thase
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry, Western Psychiatric Institute and ClinicUniversity of Pittsburgh, School of MedicinePittsburghUSA

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