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Eating Disorders

  • Donald A. Williamson
  • C. J. Davis
  • Laurie Ruggiero

Abstract

Anorexia nervosa, bulimia, and obesity are the most common eating disorders seen in medical and mental health settings. In recent years, these disorders have received increasing attention from researchers in the fields of psychology, psychiatry, and medicine. Earlier efforts to identify specific physical or neurological causes of these disorders were generally unsuccessful. However, more recent models that have integrated biological and psychological factors have produced more encouraging results (Rosen & Leitenberg, 1982; Stunkard, 1980). These more integrated models have led researchers to begin the development of more innovative and comprehensive treatment approaches (Brownell, 1982). One of the implications of these more integrated treatment approaches is that psychologists, in particular, must become familiar with the medical consequences of these eating disorders so that proper assessment of these medical problems can be accomplished and appropriate referrals for medical treatment can be made. The purposes of this chapter are to describe the common physical problems that accompany anorexia nervosa, bulimia, and obesity, and to point out the implications of these problems for treatment planning.

Keywords

Anorexia Nervosa Eating Disorder Binge Eating Bulimia Nervosa Rapid Weight Gain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Donald A. Williamson
    • 1
  • C. J. Davis
    • 1
  • Laurie Ruggiero
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyLouisiana State UniversityBaton RougeUSA

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