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The Physical Environment and Cognitive Development in Child-Care Centers

  • Gary T. Moore

Abstract

According to projections given in the Federal Register, 9 out of 10 households in the United States with children under 4 years of age will use some form of day care in the 1980s. The figure of 1.2 million children in day care in 1976 may rise to more than 111/2 million children by 1990. At the beginning of the decade, about 35% of children in day care were in in-home care, over 45% in family day care, and less than 20% in center-based day care (these figures are based on 1978 HEW statistics). If these trends continue, we might expect over 4 million children in in-home care, over 5 million in family day care, and around 21/2 million in more formal child-care centers by the end of the decade.

Keywords

Cognitive Development Exploratory Behavior Behavior Setting Small Group Size Closed Plan 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gary T. Moore
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Architecture and Urban PlanningUniversity of Wisconsin-MilwaukeeMilwaukeeUSA

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