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Experiments on Electron-Impact Excitation and Ionization of Ions

  • R. A. Phaneuf
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSB, volume 145)

Abstract

The challenge of understanding the characteristics and behavior of the so-called fourth state of matter, the ionized plasma, requires quantitative information on both the structure and collisional properties of ions. The simple glow-discharge tube, the laboratory ion source, the controlled-thermonuclear fusion plasma, the ionosphere, the solar corona — they all share one common attribute — their microscopic and macroscopic properties are controlled to a large degree by inelastic collisions between electrons and ions. The delicate balance produced by the continual interchange of kinetic, radiative and potential energy determines the signature by which such a plasma communicates with its surroundings, namely the light it produces. For even the simplest of plasmas, the interpretation of the spectrum of radiation which is emitted requires detailed knowledge of both the electronic structure of the ionic species present, and of the collision processes by which these ions reach and leave the excited ionic states from which the radiation occurs. At higher particle densities, the transport of radiation within the plasma must also be taken into consideration.

Keywords

Ionization Cross Section Excitation Cross Section Double Ionization Absolute Cross Section Collision Strength 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. A. Phaneuf
    • 1
  1. 1.Physics DivisionOak Ridge National LaboratoryOak RidgeUSA

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