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Metabolism of Exogenous Gangliosides in Cultured Fibroblasts and Cerebellar Cells

  • Günter Schwarzmann
  • Ute Hinrichs
  • Sybille Sonderfeld
  • Derek Marsh
  • Konrad Sandhoff
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 116)

Abstract

Gangliosides are present in the plasma membrane of animal cells and are highly abundant in neuronal tissues. Their ceramide portion is embedded in the outer leaflet of the lipid bilayer, while their sialooligosaccharide residues are oriented towards the extracellular space.

Keywords

Skin Fibroblast Sugar Nucleotide Acidic Lipid Cerebellar Cell Lipid Storage Disease 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Günter Schwarzmann
    • 1
  • Ute Hinrichs
    • 1
  • Sybille Sonderfeld
    • 1
  • Derek Marsh
    • 2
  • Konrad Sandhoff
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für Organische Chemie und BiochemieUniversität BonnBonn 1Germany
  2. 2.Abt. SpektroskopieMax-Planck-Institut für biophysikalische ChemieGöttingenGermany

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