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Immunological Studies on Lysosomal Sphingomyelinase: Immunization Procedures, Properties of Polyclonal and Monoclonal Antibodies Obtained and Effect of Triton X-100 on Binding of Enzyme Activity

  • E. J. M. Al
  • G. Weitz
  • K. Sandhoff
  • J. A. Barranger
  • J. H. M. Hilgers
  • J. M. Tager
  • A. W. Schram
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 116)

Abstract

Sphingomyelinase hydrolyses sphingomyelin to ceramide and phosphoryl choline. In tissues from patients suffering from Niemann-Pick disease type A and B this lysosomal, membrane-associated enzyme is deficient and sphingomyelin accumulates1. In tissues from patients with Niemann-Pick disease type C, sphingomyelin also accumulates but sphingomyelinase is not deficient1.

Keywords

Spleen Cell Sodium Dodecyl Sulphate Phosphoryl Choline Immunoblotting Experiment Urine Concentrate 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. J. M. Al
    • 1
    • 2
  • G. Weitz
    • 3
  • K. Sandhoff
    • 3
  • J. A. Barranger
    • 4
  • J. H. M. Hilgers
    • 2
  • J. M. Tager
    • 1
  • A. W. Schram
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratory of BiochemistryUniversity of AmsterdamAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Section for Tumor BiologyNetherlands Cancer InstituteAmsterdamThe Netherlands
  3. 3.Institute of Organic Chemistry and BiochemistryUniversity of BonnBonnFederal Republic of Germany
  4. 4.Clincal Investigations and Therapeutics Section and Molecular and Medical Genetics Section, Developmental and Metabolic Neurology BranchNational Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke, National Institutes of HealthBethesdaUSA

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