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Immunological Studies on Acidic Sphingomyelinase

  • Robert Rousson
  • Marie T. Vanier
  • Pierre Louisot
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 116)

Abstract

Intrinsic properties of acidic sphingomyelinase cause major difficulties in attempts to produce a satisfactory antibody. The only two published papers do not carry conviction: the monoclonal antibody described by Freeman et al. (1983) was not demonstrated to precipitate sphingomyelinase activity while monospecificity of the polyclonal antibody prepared from a urine source by Weitz et al. (1985) is questionable.

Keywords

Phosphoryl Choline Final Preparation Pure Preparation Sphingomyelinase Activity Goat Antirabbit Antibody 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert Rousson
    • 1
  • Marie T. Vanier
    • 1
  • Pierre Louisot
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire de BiochimieINSERM U 189, Faculté de Médecine Lyon-SudOullins CedexFrance

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