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Characterization of an Acetylhydrolase Isolated from Rat Alveolar Macrophages in Comparison with the Enzyme Present in Vivo in Lung Alveoli

  • Marie-Claude Prévost
  • Eric Coulais
  • Clotilde Cariven
  • Hugues Chap
  • Louis Douste-Blazy
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 116)

Abstract

We have previously demonstratedl, with a 9‰ NaC1 + 5 mM EDTA lung alveolar lavage (LAL), the absence of PAF-acether in control rats. PAFacether appeared after hypoxia in lung alveoli (1.05 ± 0.5 × 10-2 nmol); under these conditions, the amount of PAF-acether still remained 1000 times lower than that of lyso-PAF-acether (12.1 ± 4.1 nmol). This could indicate either a direct liberation of the PAF-acether precursor (lyso-PAF-acether) or a secondary hydrolysis of PAF-acether by an acetylhydrolase, which might thus exert a protective action against the effects of PAF-acether.

Keywords

Alveolar Macrophage Platelet Activate Factor Lung Alveolus Alveolar Macro Secondary Hydrolysis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marie-Claude Prévost
    • 1
  • Eric Coulais
    • 1
  • Clotilde Cariven
    • 1
  • Hugues Chap
    • 1
  • Louis Douste-Blazy
    • 1
  1. 1.Biochimie des Lipides, Hôpital PurpanINSERM Unité 101ToulouseFrance

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