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Structure and Regulated Expression of Bovine Prolactin and Bovine Growth Hormone Genes

  • Fritz Rottman
  • Sally Camper
  • Edward Goodwin
  • Robert Hampson
  • Robert Lyons
  • Dennis Sakai
  • Richard Woychik
  • Yvonne Yao
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 205)

Abstract

Prolactin and growth hormone are members of a gene family which has been extensively studied during the past several years (Miller and Eberhardt, 1983). Along with the gonadotropins, the members of this gene family are primarily expressed in the anterior pituitary. The expression of these genes and their corresponding regulatory factors has been of interest from the perspective of differential regulation during developmental stages, hormonal effects on gene expression, and the possibility of expression at ectopic sites other than the pituitary (Gluckman et al., 1981). Studies described in this manuscript are restricted to the growth hormone and prolactin genes and more specifically to aspects of gene structure which influence the level of their respective mRNAs.

Keywords

Growth Hormone Polyadenylation Site Growth Hormone Gene Growth Hormone mRNA Prolactin Gene 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fritz Rottman
    • 1
  • Sally Camper
    • 1
  • Edward Goodwin
    • 1
  • Robert Hampson
    • 1
  • Robert Lyons
    • 1
  • Dennis Sakai
    • 1
  • Richard Woychik
    • 1
  • Yvonne Yao
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Molecular Biology and MicrobiologyCase Western Reserve UniversityClevelandUSA

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