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Disturbances of Extracellular Homeostasis after a Primary Insult as a Mechanism in Secondary Brain Damage

  • K. G. Go
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSA, volume 115)

Abstract

In the analysis of the multitude of lesions causing damage to the brain, the concept of secondary brain damage has evolved as a form of damage that is not inherent to the primary insult, although it is the consequence of a detrimental chain of events that may follow. In a follow-up study on craniocerebral trauma, it appeared that among patients with severe primary injury as indicated by the low scores on the Glasgow Coma Scale, there was a group with an initial higher score, which subsequently deteriorated and ended fatally (Minderhoud, 1977). It is tempting to assume, that the latter group represented those patients, who might have suffered from secondary brain damage in addition to their severe primary injury.

Keywords

Brain Edema Colloid Osmotic Pressure Cold Injury Edema Fluid Freezing Injury 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. G. Go
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of NeurosurgeryUniversity of GroningenThe Netherlands

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