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Nuclear Physics Investigations Using Medium Energy Coincidence Experiments

  • George E. Walker
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSB, volume 142)

Abstract

In the last decade, there has been considerable advantage in comparing information obtained in such reactions as (e,e′), (p,p′) and (π,π′). As the field of intermediate energy physics moves into the era where high precision coincidence experiments such as (e,e′p), (e,e;′π); (p,2p), (p,p′π); (π,π′p) and (π,2π) are performed, it seems useful to review the kinds of physics that will be investigated and the advantages of using electromagnetic and strong probes together. In general, the higher counting rates associated with strong projectiles make coincidence experiments with these probes somewhat easier. Thus, identifying interesting features first from such experiments may occur. On the other hand, studies of these features may depend on the use of the well understood but experimentally challenging electromagnetic probe coincidence experiments. We shall pursue this theme in some of the examples below. In the next section, we discuss possibilities using electromagnetic probe coincidence experiments. Following that, we present in sections III and IV some recent results using strong probes and some suggestions for future coincidence experiments. Finally, in the last section, we briefly summarize and suggest some joint studies using strong and electromagnetic exclusive reactions.

Keywords

Pion Production Medium Energy Nuclear Excitation Charge Exchange Reaction Strong Probe 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • George E. Walker
    • 1
  1. 1.Nuclear Theory Center and Physics Dept.Indiana UniversityBloomingtonUSA

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