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Tentative Identification of the Choline Transporter in Cholinergic Presynaptic Plasma Membrane Preparations from Torpedo Electric Organ

  • I. Ducis
Part of the Advances in Behavioral Biology book series (ABBI, volume 30)

Abstract

Sealed vesiculated membrane fragments, isolated from various tissues (1, 11, 14, 22), have proved extremely useful for studying the transport of many substances across membranes. Recently, neurotransmitter uptake has been studied in resealed plasma membrane fragments after osmotic lysis of synaptosomes (3, 10, 14, 17, 21). Isolated vesiculated synaptic membranes are a useful means of studying neuronal uptake mechanisms since energy sources can be readily controlled and there is no subsequent intracellular storage and metabolism of the substance under investigation. Although resealed membrane fragments have been used to study uptake processes in mammalian presynaptic terminals, only the transport of putative amino acid neurotransmitters has been reported (14, 17, 21).

Keywords

Incubation Medium Membrane Fraction Membrane Fragment Choline Uptake Plasma Membrane Vesicle 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Press, New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. Ducis
    • 1
  1. 1.Abteilung NeurochemieMax-Planck-Institut für Biophysikalische ChemieGottingenFR Germany

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